Coriander seeds

Roots

Coriander roots have a deeper, more intense flavor than the leaves. They are used in a variety of Asian cuisines. They are commonly used in Thai dishes, including soups and curry pastes.

Ground cinnamon

Cinnamon bark is widely used as a spice. It is principally employed in cookery as a condiment and flavoring material. It is used in the preparation of chocolate, especially in Mexico, which is the main importer of true cinnamon. It is also used in the preparation of some kinds of desserts, such as apple pie, donuts, and cinnamon buns as well as spicy candies, tea, hot cocoa, and liqueurs. True cinnamon, rather than cassia, is more suitable for use in sweet dishes. In the Middle East, it is often used in savory dishes of chicken and lamb.

Caraway seeds

The fruits, usually used whole, have a pungent, anise-like flavor and aroma that comes from essential oils, mostly carvone and limonene. They are used as a spice in breads, especially rye bread. Seeded rye bread is denser partly because the limonene from the caraway fruits has yeast-killing properties.[citation needed]

Caraway is also used in liquors, casseroles, curry and other foods. It is more commonly found in European cuisine. For example, it is commonly added to sauerkraut.

It is also used to add flavor to cheeses such as pultost, nøkkelost and havarti. Akvavit and several liqueurs are made with caraway. In the United Kingdom it is (or was) commonly used in "seedy cake" (possibly originating in Cornwall) - similar to a Madeira cake but using the caraway seeds instead of lemon and orange.

A carminative or a tea (tisane) made from the seeds is used as a remedy for colic, loss of appetite and digestive disorders and to dispel worms. Caraway seed oil is also used as a fragrance component in soaps, lotions, and perfumes.

The roots may be cooked as a root vegetable like parsnips or carrots.